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   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42-43

Social media posts: A key influencer of health-related behavior among Nigerians


1 Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc; Mental and Oral Health Development Organization Inc; Medical Research Unit, Adonai Hospital, Karu, LGA; Department of Community Health, Aminu Musa Habib College of Health Science and Technology, Yauri, Nigeria
2 Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc; Mental and Oral Health Development Organization Inc, Karu, LGA, Nigeria
3 Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Karu, LGA; Abuja Field Office, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria
4 Department of Community Health, Aminu Musa Habib College of Health Science and Technology, Yauri, Nigeria

Date of Submission05-Feb-2021
Date of Decision12-Feb-2021
Date of Acceptance12-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication26-Jun-2021

Correspondence Address:
Kehinde Kazeem Kanmod
Medical Research Unit, Adonai Hospital, Karu LGA
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njgp.njgp_3_21

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How to cite this article:
Kanmod KK, Nwafor NJ, Amoo BA, Hundeji AA. Social media posts: A key influencer of health-related behavior among Nigerians. Niger J Gen Pract 2021;19:42-3

How to cite this URL:
Kanmod KK, Nwafor NJ, Amoo BA, Hundeji AA. Social media posts: A key influencer of health-related behavior among Nigerians. Niger J Gen Pract [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Nov 28];19:42-3. Available from: https://www.njgp.org/text.asp?2021/19/1/42/319546



To the Editor,

Social media is a widely known source of information on issues pertaining to health.[1],[2] Between January 12, 2020, and February 21, 2020, we conducted a randomized online survey to obtain information from the Nigerian public on the impacts of health-related posts they see on social media on their behavior. The study tool used was an e-questionnaire (Google Form). Participation in the survey was completely voluntary, anonymous, and harmless. We also obtained approval to conduct the survey from the Research Committee, Department of Community Health, Aminu Musa Habib College of Health Science and Technology, Yauri, Nigeria.

A total of 235 Nigerian adults aged 18–45 years participated in the survey. All, except one (who had primary school education), of them had tertiary and/or secondary school education. The majority (89.4%, 211/235) of them reported that they had been influenced in one way or the other by what they see on social media; of which 79.6% (168/211) of them identified that they were enlightened, through social media, on issues pertaining to health matters. Furthermore, 68.7% (145/211) of them identified that they have made major health decisions based on what they saw on social media. Virtually, all (97.2%, 205/211) of those respondents who reported that they have ever been influenced by what they see on social media indicated that they were happy to engage themselves with health-related posts on social media, of which 41.5% (85/205) of them found pictures to be more engaging [Table 1].
Table 1: Influence of social media on the respondents

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From our survey findings, we observed that posts on social media are sources of information that has the capacity to influence the formation, modification, and termination of health behavior among Nigerians.

The social media community is a virtual world free for all where people share, express, or exchange ideas, information, expressions, and feelings. Pertinently, on social media platforms, myriads of health-related information fly around, of which some of those health-related information are pro-health and on safe practices while some are unsafe and misleading.[1],[2] This shows that health-related posts on social media are not completely reliable.

With the on-going trend of misleading posts (e.g., fake news) on social media, there is an urgent need for the formulation and enforcement of public health regulations that will protect the public from misleading information, especially those pieces of information which when consumed can generate negative behaviors/habits.[3] Based on the above, we recommend that: (i) national, regional, and local regulatory agencies should formulate and enact policies and laws that will regulate health-related posts on the media– mass media and social media; (ii) managers and administrators of social media should censor all health-related posts on social media, if practically possible; (iii) social media users should always ensure that they cautiously check for the validity and reliability of health-related information posted on social media before consumption; (iv) the dissemination of unsafe and misleading information should be widely discouraged and considered socially unacceptable.

Financial support and sponsorship

Self-funded/no extrenal funding.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kanmodi KK, Adegbile OE, Ogidan IO, Kanmodi PA. What are we learning on social media about shisha? A case study of top 50 short English YouTube shisha videos. Yen Med J 2020;2:38-47.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Nwafor JN, Kanmodi KK, Amoo BA. How enlightening and reliable are cancer-related posts on social media platforms? Opinions of a sample of Nigerians. J Health Allied Sci 2021;00:1-6. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729776  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kanmodi KK. Combating fake news on COVID-19 in Africa: Is punitive measures the best strategy? Yen Med J 2020;2:3-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]


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